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A departmental reuse case study is an easy win!

Case study, Increasing participation, Easy wins

When it comes to culture change: One of the most persuasive sources of information that staff need to hear to make that change is word of mouth influence from other staff.

Just like when you’re shopping online and want to browse through the customer reviews, staff want to see what kinds of experiences other people have had with your proposed culture change project.

I was speaking to Alex Fowler from Humberside NHS recently and he said that there were departments within his organisation who were now using 100% reused furniture.

This got me thinking about making it easy for Alex to do a case study in these departments. So see below for our downloadable template.

In this case we are talking about identifying a department who are doing really well on your furniture and equipment reuse program, however it can apply to any culture change project.

In this blog post we explain a couple of benefits of using case study and give you access to a template  to go about creating a case study in order to increase participation in your online reuse portal.

Case studies are one of the most important tools in your arsenal for a variety of reasons. Let’s go through a few of the benefits of using case studies:

 

Turn your reuse journey into a story

Everyone loves a story. Case studies are stories, with a beginning, a middle and an end. A typical format introduces your departmental staff (your characters), fills you in on the conflict they experienced, and then wraps it up with the resolution- your reuse project.

Your staff who are making progress are the main protagonists of these stories and your culture change project (reuse in this case) is what helps them save the day. This makes case studies both engaging and relevant. And even better — they always have a happy ending!

 

Peer-to-Peer Influence

One of the most obvious benefits of using case studies is that they represent the view of your staff, not your sustainability department, procurement manager or waste manager.  Case studies come from the mouth of the staff body, so they act as a third party endorsement of your furniture reuse program. Including direct quotes can add even more credibility.

 

Create helpful resources for sharing with others in your sector

Case studies are a great way to help others in your sector. Share your success with others to maximise your impact! Others in your sector want to know how well you are doing so they can repeat the process and save time and money. You also get to show leadership and raise the profile of your institution.  

 

Discover your Reuse Evangelists

Having evangelists for your reuse program is important because word of mouth influence is the best influence! When you create a case study, you typically approach several of your departments to ask them to participate. This process will naturally lead you to the people who are willing to become your reuse evangelists. Once you know your evangelists you can put more focus on them and they naturally do your job for you! More on this in the blog soon.

 

What now?

Download our template below and find a department for your case study! (See below how Warp It helps with that)

!DOWNLOAD THE TEMPLATE!

 

 

PS

Did you know? When you log into Warp It you can see which departments are doing the best on your furniture reuse system as a league table. 1) Log in as admin> edit profile>input your departments. 2) The next time staff log in they will be prompted to select their department 3) All future members will also input their department 4) Then we produce league tables for your departmental reuse rates- found under internal leagues. (Please note we are building a bulk upload for department info right now.)

 

About the Author..

Daniel O'Connor

Daniel O'Connor

My goal is where reuse & repair is so convenient and desirable, that organisations do not throw anything away or buy anything new.. Where reusable items are redistributed for their 2nd and 3rd useful lives and when the items fail, they are diverted into repair.

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